Press

Red Orbit, Aug 13 2012

Water’s fate in China mirrors problems across the world: fouled, pushed far from its natural origins, squandered and exploited.

In this week’s Science magazine, Jianguo “Jack” Liu, director of Michigan State University’s Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, and doctoral student Wu Yang look at lessons learned in China and management strategies that hold solutions for China – and across the world.

NSF 360, Aug 13 2012

Water’s fate in China mirrors problems across the world: fouled, pushed far from its natural origins, squandered and exploited. In this week’s Science magazine, Jianguo “Jack” Liu, director of Michigan State University’s Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, and doctoral student Wu Yang look at lessons learned in China and management strategies that hold solutions for China -- and across the world.

Reuters, Aug 13 2012

The kind of top-down bureaucracy that can discourage communication and hobble some Western corporations is fueling widespread problems with China's water supply, with lessons for the rest of the world, researchers reported on Thursday.

 

So-called stovepipe bureaucracy -- where different departments communicate with their own teams and managers but not with others that might be related -- makes it harder for China to deal with critical water sustainability issues, the scientists wrote in the current edition of the journal Science.

Yahoo! News, Aug 13 2012

Anyone watching U.S. Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas in her last two events (the individual finals for the uneven bars and balance beam) may wonder if the 16-year-old who helped the U.S. women win the gold in the team competition and captured the individual gold in the all-around is tuckered out — she fell off the beam, and faltered on the bars.

Food Safety News, Aug 7 2012

Last year's German E. coli outbreak made headlines around the world in May and June as it sickened nearly 3,800 people and killed 50, distinguishing it as the single deadliest foodborne illness outbreak of all time. The outbreak was a dramatic entrance to the world stage for the microbe at the center of it all, a little-known strain of E. coli known as O104:H4, that caused German authorities facing a nation of overwhelmed hospitals to declare on May 22, "Clearly, we are faced with an unusual situation."

MLive, Aug 7 2012

Michigan State University says it's receiving a $7.3 million federal grant to help develop the next generation of agricultural scientists in Africa and Asia.

The new Borlaug Higher Education Agricultural Research and Development program is named for Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Norman Borlaug. The money comes from the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Huffington Post, Aug 7 2012

Parents get physical with unruly children far more in public than they do when they know psychologists or other researchers are looking, a new study finds.

In an experiment that involved surreptitiously watching parents discipline their kids in public places such as restaurants, researchers found that in 23 percent of cases, mom or dad resorted to "negative touch" to get their child to comply. Negative touch can include anything from restraining and spanking to pinching and hitting.

CBSNews.com, Aug 7 2012

Nearly one in four parents or caregivers randomly observed by researchers publicly settled disputes with their child by hitting, spanking or some sort of physical contact, a new study shows.

Researchers at Michigan State University in East Lansing covertly camped out at public areas to get a realistic idea of how children are disciplined outside of a laboratory setting.

FUTURITY, Aug 6 2012

Twenty-three percent of kids received some kind of physical discipline when they failed to obey their caregiver in public, and moms were more likely to use “negative touch” than dads.

Parents use physical discipline much more in real-world settings than in a laboratory study or they admit in surveys. The physical discipline, called “negative touch,” included arm pulling, pinching, slapping, and spanking.

MLive, Aug 6 2012

Parents use spanking and other physical discipline on their children in public more often than they admit in surveys or show in laboratory studies, according to a new report from Michigan State University.

MSU researchers anonymously observed 106 discipline interactions between children ages 3-5 and their caregivers in public places.