Press

phys.org, Oct 3 2012

"Microbial alchemy is what we're doing – transforming gold from something that has no value into a solid, precious metal that's valuable," said Kazem Kashefi, assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics.

He and Adam Brown, associate professor of electronic art and intermedia, found the metal-tolerant bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans can grow on massive concentrations of gold chloride – or liquid gold, a toxic chemical compound found in nature.

The Detroit News, Oct 3 2012

...Michigan State University was awarded $600,000 for developing a hand-held device to analyze environmental DNA in the field, said Syed Hashsham, an environmental engineering professor. He and colleagues are working on ways to find the genetic material in large volumes of water instead of the small samples now taken.

A similar grant was approved for work at the University of Toledo on DNA diagnostic tests.

YAHOO! News, Oct 3 2012

More and more U.S. businesses are realizing their decisions to move manufacturing jobs overseas wasn't all it was cracked up to be, a new study finds.

Research from Tobias Schoenherr, a Michigan State University assistant professor and supply chain expert,  found that an increasing number of U.S. firms are moving, or considering moving, their international manufacturing operations back to domestic soil.

CNN Health, Oct 3 2012

Blame for a teen’s unhealthy body image often falls on the media. The barrage of size-zero supermodels and waif-like celebrities walking the red carpet could push anyone to curse their shape, right?

A study published this week in the International Journal of Eating Disorders finds a new culprit may also be partially to blame: Our genes.

R&D mag, Oct 3 2012

At a time when the value of gold has reached an all-time high, Michigan State University researchers have discovered a bacterium’s ability to withstand incredible amounts of toxicity is key to creating 24-karat gold.

"Microbial alchemy is what we're doing—transforming gold from something that has no value into a solid, precious metal that's valuable," says Kazem Kashefi, assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics.

ScienceBlog, Oct 3 2012

Increasingly, U.S. firms are moving or considering moving their manufacturing operations back to domestic soil from overseas, finds a new study co-authored by a Michigan State University supply chain expert.

Fueling the trend are rising labor costs in emerging countries, high oil prices and increasing transportation costs, global risks such as political instability and other factors, said Tobias Schoenherr.

CBS Detroit, Oct 3 2012

EAST LANSING (WWJ/AP) - Two projects led by a Michigan State University professor aim to help Michigan National Guard members and their families in the transition from active duty to civilian life.

The East Lansing school announced earlier this week that the work by Adrian Blow and others is getting $1.5 million in funding.

With the first initiative, funded by a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Defense, Blow and colleagues will study resiliency in military families, working directly with National Guard veterans and their spouses and parents.

Holland Sentinel, Oct 3 2012

Holland —New research findings about the geological and archaeological aspects of the Lake Michigan coastal dunes will help local governments and organizations protect them.

“It’s important to make sure we haven’t damaged or destroyed dunes in an archaeological site,” said state Archaeologist Dean Anderson. He said information about dunes in the past concerns not only cultural but environmental methods.

Michigan Radio, Oct 3 2012

Scientists who are helping to build the a nuclear research facility at Michigan State University are the focus of a study that looks at teamwork. 

The construction of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams -- or F-RIB -- will take thousands of people.

The National Science Foundation kicked in about a million dollars for a study to see how well the teams communicate and work with other teams.

MSU Professor John Hollenbeck is one of the leaders of the study.

He says they'll use electronic badges with GPS to monitor interactions.

The Holland Sentinel, Sep 30 2012

New research findings about the geological and archaeological aspects of the Lake Michigan coastal dunes will help local governments and organizations protect them.

“It’s important to make sure we haven’t damaged or destroyed dunes in an archaeological site,” said state Archaeologist Dean Anderson. He said information about dunes in the past concerns not only cultural but environmental methods.