Press

Tijgers passenhun dag-en-nachtritmeaanomhet leven in de nabijheid vanmensen tekunnenvolhouden. Dit blijkt uit onderzoek van de Michigan State University in een natuurgebied in Nepal. Vantijgerswerd juist gedacht dat ze alleenkonden overleven in een groot gebied zonder menselijke aanwezigheid.

Red Orbit, Sep 4 2012

Tigers, though beautiful, do not have a reputation for being accommodating.

A new study at the Chitwan National Park in Nepal, indicates that the feared and revered carnivores are taking the night shift to better coexist with their human neighbors.

Scientific American, Sep 4 2012

In an ideal ecosystem, each species has its own niche – a different “job description”: what it does, what it eats, where it sleeps, and more.

But world is often not an ideal place. In many instances, two species may live in the same spot, yet overlap in some of their roles or needs. They may both compete for the same tree-holes or caves for dwelling, or they may eat the same food. It is not necessary for the two species to be aggressive toward each other, but it is likely that one of the species will be more efficient in gaining the resource than the other.

Phys.org, Sep 4 2012

Tigers don't have a reputation for being accommodating, but a new study indicates that the feared and revered carnivores in and around a world-renowned park in Nepal are taking the night shift to better coexist with their human neighbors.

The revelation that tigers and people are sharing exactly the same space – such as the same roads and trails – of Chitwan National Park flies in the face of long-held convictions in conservation circles. It also underscores how successful conservation efforts need sciences that takes into account both nature and humans.

Science Daily, Sep 4 2012

Tigers aren't known for being accommodating, but a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates that the carnivores in Nepal are taking the night shift to better coexist with humans.

The revelation that tigers and people are sharing exactly the same space -- the same roads and trails -- of Chitwan National Park flies in the face of long-held convictions in conservation circles. It also underscores how successful conservation efforts need sciences that takes into account both nature and humans.

the forests of Nepal, daytime belongs to humans, but the night is the time of the tigers, a new study finds. The results may reveal how people and predatory cats manage to coexist.

A two-year study of video from more than 70 motion-activated cameras near Chitwan National Park in south-central Nepal finds that endangered tigers aren't necessarily driven from their forest habitats when humans share the same space. Instead, the tigers restrict their usual round-the-clock activity to nighttime.

NSF Science 360, Sep 4 2012

Tigers don't have a reputation for being accommodating, but a new study indicates that the feared and revered carnivores in and around a world-renowned park in Nepal are taking the night shift to better coexist with their human neighbors.

The revelation that tigers and people are sharing exactly the same space -- such as the same roads and trails -- of Chitwan National Park flies in the face of long-held convictions in conservation circles.

BBC News, Sep 4 2012

Tigers in Nepal seem to be taking night shifts in order to avoid their human neighbours, a study has shown.

The big cats generally move around at all times of the day and night, to monitor territory, mate and hunt.

New York Times, Sep 4 2012

In an increasingly crowded world, wildlife conservation often requires that humans share space with large carnivores. But living alongside potentially deadly 670-pound tigers poses its challenges, and the tigers must similarly contend with human disturbances. Two new studies suggest that it is possible to find an equilibrium, however.

FUTURITY, Aug 31 2012

Researchers created the digital equivalent of spring break to see how mate attraction played out through computer programs.

“This is actually a big question that still generates a lot of debate,” says Chris Chandler, a postdoctoral researchers at Michigan State University and co-author of the study published in the journal Evolution. “People have some good ideas, but they can be hard to test really well in nature, so we decided to take a different approach.”