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MSU Shows Autonomous Vehicle Technology at 2018 NAIAS

MSU Autonomous Vehicle

As winter swirls around the 2018 North American International Auto Show at Detroit’s Cobo Center, Michigan State University researchers will be there to demonstrate advanced technology aiming to overcome even the most challenging driving conditions.

MSU will showcase its autonomous vehicle computer vision and sensor technology during AutoMobili-D at the auto show, or NAIAS, Jan. 14-21. At AutoMobili-D, researchers, companies and tech startups showcase their technologies and preview products to an unrivaled concentration of industry players and international media.

Researchers will demonstrate the university’s strength in autonomous sensor technology for “superhuman” situational awareness, including laser radar “lidar” units creating 3-D maps of the driving environment. The vehicle-mounted sensors gather information that then is processed by advanced algorithms to allow the vehicle to safely maneuver through conditions including snow, heavy traffic and pedestrian hazards.

“Part of our work focuses on integrating the vehicle with its environment,” said Hayder Radha, professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of MSU’s Connected and Autonomous Networked Vehicles for Active Safety, or CANVAS. “MSU is a recognized leader in computer vision, radars and antenna design, and the areas that are at the core of self-driving vehicles like high-assurance computing and related technologies.”

In addition to displaying its 2016 Lincoln MKZ hybrid, Michigan State will show its newest acquisition, a Chevrolet Bolt EV, at the NAIAS Charity Preview Jan. 19. General Motors Co. gifted that vehicle after MSU was selected among just eight North Amercian universities to compete in the AutoDrive Challenge. The three-year competition co-sponsored by engineering association SAE International challenges engineering schools to partner with GM and key suppliers to develop and demonstrate cars that can safely navigate an urban driving course in an automated mode.

“Michigan ranks No. 1 nationally in new automotive-related job growth, in concentrations of mechanical, electrical and industrial engineers and is where 75 percent of the auto industry’s total research and development dollars are spent,” MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon said. “We are grateful to MAGNA for providing a place for us to showcase our developing technologies and developing experts too.”

MSU will also send two other student competition vehicles to NAIAS. The Formula SAE team car and the Solar Racing Car team will be on exhibit in separate locations inside Cobo Hall during AutoMobili-D.

Click here to learn more about MSU’s CANVAS research and autonomous vehicle technology development.

  • Francie ToddPatricia Mroczek via MSU Today

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