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Bees

New Discovery from Michigan’s First, Full Bee Census

Thursday, December 7, 2017

The first complete bee census, led by Michigan State University scientists, confirmed a new species and revealed that the actual number of bee species in Michigan exceeded earlier…

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MSU Researchers Find Ways to Kill Pests, Not Honeybees

Tuesday, November 21, 2017
Bombus impatiens nectaring on Lantana sp. in Okemos, Michigan. Photo taken September 24, 2017 by F. W. Ravlin. Canon 5D Mark III, 100 mm macro.

Researchers at Michigan State University’s entomology department have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide’s effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study,…

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MSU Researchers Making Progress in Protecting Bees

Friday, June 24, 2016
wild bee

It’s been four years since Michigan State University AgBioResearch entomologist Rufus Isaacs and his team set out to find methods that could help growers ensure their crops were…

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Researchers Learn Reproductive Secrets of Destructive Bee Parasite

Wednesday, June 15, 2016
bee parasites

New insights into the reproductive secrets of one of the world’s tiniest and most destructive parasites – the Varroa mite – has scientists edging closer to regulating them….

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Smart Planting Can Attract, Protect Pollinators

Thursday, April 28, 2016
bee

Michigan State University (MSU) entomologist David Smitley has spearheaded a multistate collaboration to create a new online publication offering tips on how best to protect pollinators in urban…

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Decline of Wild Bees Threatens U.S. Crops

Monday, December 21, 2015

The first national study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they’re disappearing in many of the country’s most-important farmlands. If losses of these crucial pollinators continue, the new…

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Honeybee Parasite Invades by ‘Smelling Like Bees’

Wednesday, June 3, 2015
varroa mites

New research has revealed that Varroa mites, the most-serious threat to honeybees worldwide, are infiltrating hives by smelling like bees. The Michigan State University-led study, appearing in the…

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