deforestation

MSU News, Jul 7 2010

During his unprecedented expedition into the heart of the Amazon, Michigan State University geographer Bob Walker discovered surprising evidence that many of the Brazilian government’s efforts to protect the environment are working.

As expected, Walker and two fellow scientists – the first research team to travel a 700-mile stretch of the so-called Transamazon Highway in the western Amazon basin – confirmed the existence of illegal logging and gold-mining operations that threaten further damage to the world’s largest rainforest.

MSU News, May 25 2010

Five years ago, Bob Walker stopped counting the miles he’s traveled in the Brazilian Amazon when he reached 10,000. The Michigan State University geography professor estimates he’s spent a good two years of his life crisscrossing the world’s largest rainforest to study the effects of agriculture, logging and development.

But never has Walker traveled the infamous Transamazon Highway as it extends deep into the heart of the Amazon.

Until now, that is.

MSU News, Jun 14 2009

Contrary to common belief, Brazil’s policy of protecting portions of the Amazonian forest from development is capable of buffering the Amazon from climate change, according to a new study led by Michigan State University researchers.

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, contends state and federal governments in Brazil have created a sustainable core of protected areas within the Amazon. And even if the remaining Brazilian Amazon is deforested, the climate will not significantly change – thereby protecting the Amazon’s ecosystems.